rifles GAME GUNS
rifles brandsRIFLE BRANDS
rifles reviewRIFLE REVIEWS
newsNEWS
 

Pheasant Guns | Pheasant Hunting Shotguns


Among bird hunting enthusiasts, pheasant hunting is often seen as the most important and popular bird hunting subcategory, a practice enjoyed by many people in the United States. Except the US, Asia is also a big fan of pheasant hunting. The most common mistake many hunters make when hunting pheasants is that they forget to be as silent as possible; making noise will significantly decrease the chances of catching a few of these birds.

 

Pheasant Hunting Guns

The pheasant hunting guns offer a significant variety to any hunter. The most common loads for such a rifle are the no. 6 and the no. 7 /12 because they are considered to be the most efficient. The first shot is extremely efficient if enough choke is used to keep the pattern core density high but experienced bird hunters recommend using the no.5 / no.6 and less choke, the choice is up to every hunter. The 12 gauge is slowly but certainly becoming the most recommended gauge for this type of bird hunting. The main reason behind this increasing popularity is because the 12 gauge it has a heavier payload in comparison to other smaller gauges plus it has great flexibility.


 

Pheasant Hunting Shotguns

For those of you that are considering using a 20 gauge pheasant hunting shotgun, it is advisable to use a Winchester 101 for example, or a Browning Superposed Lightning. These are of course only two examples, listed to create a better image about what to expect from a shotgun for pheasants. For those of you (and there are many) that want to get a more than necessary gun, the 30 gauge is efficient for 25-35 yards with the proper load. Combining it with the Winchester Super-X or the Feather XS shotgun, the results are quite outstanding. Here are a few other pheasant shotguns our reviewers thought of: Winchester Model 12, Beretta AL391, Weatherby SAS, Browning BPS and the Mossberg Model 500.

 

The classic best shotgun for pheasant hunting is a double barrel, either in a side by side configuration or an over and lower than configuration. These have the strong positive point of efficient ergonomics and light weight at the expense of more kickback. Double barreled guns are also roughly more expensive, although they are generally very ably made and last a long time, because they have a lesser amount of moving parts to break. A lighter weight pheasant hunting gun is a solid piece when pheasant hunting, since you are carrying it as you walk, and considering the daily pod limits on pheasant are generally lower than, for instance, dove, you won't be doing as much shooting. The best gun for pheasant hunting can also be a semiautomatic shotgun, like a Remington 1100/1187/Sportsman’s 58 or even the Browning Auto 5. Many people are also using pump action shotguns. Although they offer a lot of kickback, the ratcheting action is repeatedly quite noisy, which makes it not much fun for the hunter. Since the vast majority of people want the propensity to fire magnum shells, you and your fellow hunters might be able to get a shotgun that cannot for a bit smaller quantity money than one that can.

 

Pheasant hunting guns are available in a very wide array of forms and customizations. Some prefer a Benelli Nova, others the classic Remington 870 or the Mossberg 500. The choice is up to the end user. As a general advice, it is highly recommended to pick out a shotgun that feels comfortable and easy to carry around. Any 12 or 20 gauge shotgun should do the job as long as the shells are loaded with the proper shot sizes. Here are a few other good models of shotguns recommended for any avid pheasant hunter: Verona 502LX 20ga, Beretta Silver Pigeon, Benelli Monte 20, Valmet 412 Over/Under with 1 3/8 oz 5's, Browning Citori 20 gauge 3” and the Beretta 391. These are just a few examples offered by our reviewers in order to create a clearer image about what characteristics a good pheasant gun should have.

 
3.7
Rating: 
M 98 Magnum
rifle review
The Magnum version of the M 98 from Mauser has been fitted with a selected, checkered walnut stock with grade 5 cheek piece and a rigby-style magazine cover. It sports a rosewood forend tip and a Magnum field recoil pad. Other highlights include the steel PG cap and the single stage trigger.
Centerfire RifleType: Centerfire Rifle .375 H&HCaliber: .375 H&H
Bolt-ActionSubtype: Bolt-Action 9.25Weight: 9.25 lbs.
MauserBrand: Mauser 46Overall Length: 46 inch
btn   rifle btn
 
5.0
Rating: 
M 03 Old Classic
rifle review
This model features an M 03 Colour case hardening for the trigger and the magazine base. Thanks to its lavish custom color case hardening of the system, trigger and the base of the magazine, this model from Mauser is a real eye-catcher and has a matte black finish on the action.
Centerfire RifleType: Centerfire Rifle .308 Win.Caliber: .308 Win.
Bolt-ActionSubtype: Bolt-Action 7 3/4Weight: 7 3/4 lbs.
MauserBrand: Mauser 44Overall Length: 44 inch
btn   rifle btn
 
2.5
Rating: 
M 03 Africa
rifle review
Another M 03 model from Mauser, this one has been designed in order to combine a classic big game bolt action rifle with the diversity and safety of the M 03. Thanks to its excellent balance, the rifle guarantees rapid and intuitive aiming. It has a kickstop installed in the stock for reducing the felt recoil.
Centerfire RifleType: Centerfire Rifle 9,3 x 62Caliber: 9,3 x 62
Bolt-ActionSubtype: Bolt-Action 9 3/4Weight: 9 3/4 lbs.
MauserBrand: Mauser 44Overall Length: 44 inch
btn   rifle btn
Pages:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 »
Rifles Scopes USERS RATINGS
  • Jack Stewart says:
    A-Bolt II Hunter
    I purchased this very own model a month ago or so. I have to admit that I never owned a Browning rifle before...
  • Joe Ingram says:
    700 Sendero II
    Great long range rifle. It's too bulky for stalking but from a blind or stand it can't be beat....
rifles sponsors SPONSORS